Top

We work all over the world, click on the map below to find out more about our different projects.

?

Sierra Leone

SIERRA LEONE

The economy of Sierra Leone has been devastated from successive years of civil war and compounded by the recent and deadly outbreak of Ebola in 2014. The World Health Organisation reported the capital, Freetown, the worst hit with over a third of the countries’ cases of Ebola being reported in that one city. In such a torn apart place with many families having lost loved ones and providers we feel that our programme of empowering young women into accessible trades is invaluable for their future and the future of their communities.

“Investing in girls and women isn’t just morally right, it is essential for the development of families, communities and countries. When we educate girls, we see reduced child deaths, healthier children and mothers, fewer child marriages and faster economic growth” Julia Gillard, Girl’s Education Forum 2016

?

Romania

Even in the EU you can walk down a dirt track and find yourself back in time in a medieval reality – albeit with the occasional satellite dish poking out of a hovel. No matter how long we’ve worked in this country the level of poverty experienced by the marginalised communities never ceases to amaze us. Unfortunately, the cultural discrimination against the Romany-gypsies is so engrained, we’ve been openly laughed at by Romanians for working with “people that can’t be helped”.

“Their [Romany-gypsies] Romania is like something out of a Dickensian novel. It’s dirty, poor beyond belief, and the stench is indescribable. But the children laugh and sing and want to hold your hand and have their hair braided and ask you questions about all the mysteries of the West. Their faces will stay with me forever.” Elizabeth, Volunteer, Dec 2013

Alparea & Urvind Pre-School & Homework Help

When T4U started our first pre-school programme in Urvind (where only 1 in 10 adults could read and write) only 5% of the children attended the local state school.

Find Out More
Hide

“Without the pre-school the Romany children often struggle settling into mainstream school. Not only do they have less knowledge than the other village children, but they have had no experience of the social situations that school presents and this causes problems for the children and the teachers.” Anna-Marie, Teacher

When T4U started our first pre-school programme in Urvind (where only 1 in 10 adults could read and write) only 5% of the children attended the local state school. Now over 75% of the community’s children now attend. Of course this created its own issue as we then experienced a high drop-out rate because the children struggled with their school work with little assistance at home. Therefore we started daily afternoon Homework Help classes which provide the necessary support and structure for the children as well as fun through crafts, games and play.

Support: £18pm supports 1 child in either our Pre-school or homework help classes

Make a donation

Empowering Women

In poverty it is always the women and children that are effected the most. In Urvind we have been taking teams to do crafts, activities and basic health education with the women.

Find Out More
Hide

In poverty it is always the women and children that are effected the most. In Urvind we have been taking teams to do crafts, activities and basic health education with the women. The main purpose of these teams is to facilitate the realisation in these women that they matter, that they can take an active role in their communities, stand up for their daughters and can work together. These teams are all about providing the space and opportunity for these women to come together and realise they can have a positive impact on their community.

When we started visiting Urvind with this programme none of the women had employment outside of the duties of their home. Now, we are pleased to see some with jobs in the local factories and young girls with aspirations to be nurses, teachers or flight attendants! Dreams that weren’t dreamt a few years ago and just may have the power to change things…

?

Crimea

Our projects in the Crimea centre around supporting the pivotal work of The Children’s Hospital for Infectious Diseases in Simferopol. The doctors, nurses and other staff experience a day-to-day battle for the lives of children severely ill or even terminally sick under the strain of under-funded resources, a shell of a building, and the addition of abandoned, often HIV+, babies being left on their doorstep.

“This hospital mainly looks after children with HIV, and/or abandoned, and care for them in awful conditions. We wouldn’t keep pets in these wards. There is so little stimulation, nothing on the walls, nothing to do. I could not help noticing a boy of 6 trying to feed his baby fellow orphan with a large spoon with some kind of gruel…the nurses have so much to do.” Dave Cooke, July 2013

Ward Refurbishment

Since 2006 T4U have taken a team of volunteers to refurbish 1 of the 14 wards in the hospital each year.

Find Out More
Hide

Since 2006 T4U have taken a team of volunteers to refurbish 1 of the 14 wards in the hospital each year. The teams have re-plastered and decorated walls, installed new floors, new bathrooms, replaced curtains, furniture and bought toys, painted play-scenes and hung mobiles from cots. Before the recent crisis in the Crimea made it too difficult to continue, T4U completed 10 wards and installed bathrooms for the hospital staff.

Palliative Care Training

In 2009 and 2014 we took volunteer medical professionals to lead a program on palliative care to approximately 100 medical staff.

Find Out More
Hide

In 2009 and 2014 we took volunteer medical professionals to lead a program on palliative care to approximately 100 medical staff. The aim was to share best practice in how to meet the needs of a dying child in a family centred care approach (and how to look after yourself, as a professional), whilst also developing a Ukrainian model for the ‘Steps of End of Life Care’ which would become a poster for regional and European palliative care conferences. A similar programme was delivered to doctors and nurses caring for abandoned children in a nearby orphanage.

?

Cambodia

We connected with Hai in Prey Tasor and Mardy in Siem Reap over five years ago in their efforts to bring basic healthcare and education to the hundreds of children in their communities. Through fundraising we have been able to support the construction of a multi-purpose community centre in Prey Tasor and an extension to the Happy Heart community centre in Siem Reap facilitating English lessons, a feeding programme and a place for these children to congregate and have fun.

We have also taken Community Teams to Cambodia to help deliver basic healthcare and have been encouraged to hear that the children continue to regularly wash their hands before mealtimes and have maintained a good routine of brushing their teeth!

?

Belarus

In 2014 we went to Belarus at the request of our friend Dima to see if we could facilitate his work with children given into care, to provide structured support, advice and assistance to families who either choose to adopt or foster these children. This is a new project for us and currently revolves around providing training for the 50+ strong team of volunteers in Belarus on how to effectively deliver their objectives plus connecting them with UK leaders, experienced in the realities of fostering and adoption.

“It was so exciting to see such a young team of passionate volunteers striving to see children from difficult backgrounds flourish in a family environment. Partnering with them to take some of these children on summer camps was an undeniably humbling experience as we watched these children grow in self-esteem and confidence.” Dave Cooke, June 2015

?

Uganda

This is where it all started for us as ‘Teams4U’, in a small district called Kumi, a four hour drive north from Kampala, past Jinja and the source of the Nile. Here through experience and hard grit, we have developed our model of community development that we base all our other projects around the world on. This model focuses on four key areas: Education, Empowerment, Health and Training, which we believe is the best and only way of successfully combating poverty.

“Since my first visit Uganda has become a part of me. This year it felt like coming home” Zsofia, volunteer, Aug 2015

Develop With Dignity

Supporting schoolgirls in Uganda with sanitary wear, underwear and education on Menstrual Health

Find Out More
Hide

One of our main concerns, whilst experiencing the reality of working in Uganda, is how do we encourage and support girls to go to school and stay in education?

There are approximately 10,500 schoolgirls aged 12-16 in the Kumi District. An estimated 6,300 will drop out of education before they graduate. One of the biggest reasons for this is the school days they can lose because of menstruation. The rural shops don’t sell sanitary towels and even if they did 1 pack costs more than 1 person’s daily wage (employment rates as low as 1 in 7 in Kumi) and are absolutely no use if the child doesn’t own underwear.

One of our Ugandan partners whilst visiting his local school in Mukongoro was shocked to hear from the children themselves that only 3 in 500 owned a pair of knickers. Yet our own study in Uganda has shown a 45% increase in school attendance when girls have been provided with underwear and sanitary towels.

Since August 2015 we have partnered with Ugandan supplier AFRIpads to distribute re-usable 12mth supply kits of sanitary towels to schoolgirls in Kumi whilst asking for donations to source children’s knickers from the UK.

Read more

How you can help:

£5 per month supplies 12 schoolgirls with a 12 month kit from AFRIpads alongside our educational programme in Menstrual Health.    Make a monthly donation

Vocational Training

Our first tailoring course in Uganda started in February 2017 as part of a long-term plan to build a Vocational College in Kumi

Find Out More
Hide

In February 2017 we had our first 30 students enroll on our 2yr tailoring course in Mukongoro, Kumi, Uganda. Before this training school opened, any young adult looking for vocational skills would have to leave home and family to travel and stay in Soroti for the duration of their course. For many the financial strain of accommodation and travel, on top of course fees, is too much and therefore makes the Vocational College in Soroti not a viable option.

Our plan is to build a comparable vocational college in Kumi offering trade-skills in Masonry, Joinery, Mechanics, Hair-Dressing & Catering in addition to our Tailoring module. All students are also taught numeracy, literacy, English, Computing and Business skills to help give them the best head-start when they graduate. Our objective is to build the college so it will become self-sufficient on course fees and products/services sold by the students as they train.

We strongly believe by providing these young adults with trade-skills, we are helping them achieve financial security.

Read more Make a donation

Cervical Cancer Smears

Each year 275,000 women die from Cervical Cancer, the majority of these in developing countries where access to cervical cancer screening is rare.

Find Out More
Hide

Each year 275,000 women die from Cervical Cancer, the majority of these in developing countries where access to cervical cancer screening is rare. Indeed most of the communities we visit are not aware of the risk and often by the time the women realise they’re ill, it’s too late. It has been documented that the occurrence of Cervical Cancer is higher in populations where HIV is prevalent and yet we know that if Cervical Cancer is detected early it can be treated successfully. Since starting this programme in August 2014 we have potentially saved the lives of 39 women who would otherwise have died of unrecognised Cervical Cancer and educated a further 1,000 women about the causes, risks and factors that may predispose them to cancer of the cervix.

How you can help:

£2.50 pays for 1 women to be screened for Cervical Cancer

Make a donation

HIV/AIDs Testing

“If you know your HIV status, even if you’re HIV+, you know you can live for another 20 years. But if you don’t know you think you could die tomorrow” Daniel, AIC Volunteer

Thankfully through education, increased awareness and better access to medication and hospital controlled births, we are seeing a reduction in HIV+ cases in Uganda. That being said HIV/AIDs is still regarded as one of the main killers nationally and is still taking children away from their parents and parents away from their children.

Find Out More
Hide

“If you know your HIV status, even if you’re HIV+, you know you can live for another 20 years. But if you don’t know you think you could die tomorrow” Daniel, AIC Volunteer

Thankfully through education, increased awareness and better access to medication and hospital controlled births, we are seeing a reduction in HIV+ cases in Uganda. That being said HIV/AIDs is still regarded as one of the main killers nationally and is still taking children away from their parents and parents away from their children. T4U funding supports the work of AIC (Aids Information Centre) to run mobile clinics in the most remote areas of Kumi & Soroti, testing the most vulnerable, hard-to-access people groups and following up with them to provide their CD4 counts, advice and counselling. Unfortunately in rural communities due to the accepted practice of multiple wives, prostitution and abuse, it is still proving difficult to eradicate HIV/AIDs.

Joyce’s story:
We met Joyce at one of our mobile clinics in October 2014 where she had walked over four hours to reach us for her CD4 count. Her husband had another wife in a different village and had contracted and died of AIDs. She lost three of her children aged 3, 4 and 6, within the space of a year to AIDs. Her only surviving child was born in hospital under special care to avoid blood contamination and is therefore thankfully HIV-. Joyce has lived 17years with HIV though unfortunately this time her CD4 count came back at dangerous levels. She has to take her drugs with food both morning and evening but told us she only had enough to eat in the evening. A CD4 count can cost up to 32,000 Ugandan Shillings—the equivalent of 3 days wages —and are recommended 4 times a year. As Joyce came to the clinic supported by T4U she received this service for free.

How can you help?

£2.50 pays for 1 person to be tested for HIV/AIDs

Make a donation

Jack Standard Primary School

We met Jackson Mayanja, in 2006, whilst he was desperately trying to fund and build a school for the children and orphans in his home village of Nangunga. From his starting point of classrooms cobbled together from rough planks of wood we started a journey with him to build a school that now educates over 616 children from Nursery to Yr 7.

Find Out More
Hide

We met Jackson Mayanja, in 2006, whilst he was desperately trying to fund and build a school for the children and orphans in his home village of Nangunga. From his starting point of classrooms cobbled together from rough planks of wood we started a journey with him to build a school that now educates over 616 children from Nursery to Yr 7.

With the help of several Construction Teams, T4U have financed brick classrooms, a toilet block, dormitory, nursery block, rainwater collection systems and solar-powered electricity, plus housing for the teachers. This project is now completed.

Local Education Authority Training

Part of who we are as T4U is to see organisations and individuals who have the vision to improve their communities equipped to succeed.

Find Out More
Hide

Part of who we are as T4U is to see organisations and individuals who have the vision to improve their communities equipped to succeed. We can’t be in Uganda all the time and in fact we don’t want to be because we are not interested in creating any kind of reliance on charity but rather empower those who are working and investing in their local communities to increase what they are accomplishing by providing specific job-related training courses.

Since 2014 we have taken volunteers from the business sector in the UK to run courses on finance, asset and staff management for the Local Education Authority in Kumi. There are 150 government-funded schools in the district and our first course met 36 of the regions head-teachers. One of the most powerful and impacting parts of the course was teaching them how to budget (many never had) so that they wouldn’t run out of funds by the end of term and therefore could pay their teachers!

Non-Government Organisation Training

Since we started working in Kumi we have been invited to bring specific corporate based training to leaders and staff of various NGOs in the district, particularly the local branches of the Aids Orphans Eductation Trust (AOET) and the Aids Information Centre (AIC). Over the years we’ve delivered courses in Finance Management, Human Resources and Asset Management to their regional managers.

Find Out More
Hide

Since we started working in Kumi we have been invited to bring specific corporate based training to leaders and staff of various NGOs in the district, particularly the local branches of the Aids Orphans Eductation Trust (AOET) and the Aids Information Centre (AIC). Over the years we’ve delivered courses in Finance Management, Human Resources and Asset Management to their regional managers.

“It has given me a good package of information to become an effective manager – I can go away and put it into action. I have already began to implement what I have learnt” Zacharia Muddu, Head of Health Department.

Our aim is to help local organisations, with the vision of improving their communities, develop in the areas they feel they need support and, through the skill set of our UK volunteers, we tailor the training given to meet their specific requirements.

Newsletter

Sign up to our newsletter below

Follow

Donate

Impact the life of a child today with a donation

Teams4U is a registered charity no.1114131. ©2015 Teams4U, All rights reserved.
Trustees: Paul Jeanes, Steve Darnell, Ian Mackenzie Founder: Dave Cooke Company Secretary: John Harrison
Chairman: Nick Pengelly